Tire Sidewalls

The tire sidewall is just one of several components that make up the standard tire. For example, the bead is a rubber-coated steel cable whose function is to ensure that the tire remains attached to the wheel rim. A tire also has a body that’s comprised of several layers. These different layers are known as plies. Each layer is a different type of fabric. Polyester cord is the most popular ply fabric. Cap piles are extra layers of polyester fabric that some tires contain. Their purpose is to hold everything together. Another important part of the tire is its belt, which is made of steel and is meant to provide reinforcement to the section that’s directly underneath the tread. As for the tread, it’s basically a mixture of various synthetic and natural rubbers. Besides providing lateral stability, the tire sidewall prevents air from escaping and keeps the body plies protected. Some tire sidewalls may contain extra components that serve to increase lateral stability.

The tire sidewall is just one of several components that make up the standard tire. For example, the bead is a rubber-coated steel cable whose function is to ensure that the tire remains attached to the wheel rim. A tire also has a body that’s comprised of several layers. These different layers are known as plies.

Repair of any punctures in the shoulder and sidewall areas are not permitted. This tire has been punctured in the tread area by a screw less than 1/4″ in diameter. If no internal damage is found when the tire is dismounted, this puncture can be repairedfollowing industry guidelines and the tire returned to service.

(H) Speed Rating. The speed rating is a measurement of the speed at which the tire is designed to run for extended periods. An “H” speed rating signifies that this tire can be run safely at speeds of up to 130 mph for extended periods.

Tires have cords that run all around the tread of the tire, the part the makes contact with the road. But on the sidewall, those cords aren’t there. So, there’s just no way for a plug to fill that hole. The patch won’t hold, and it’s going to continue to leak.

In other words, if you have your tire repaired at 10,000 miles and your tire lasts for 40,000 miles, then your tire plug should last for another 30,000 miles. At an average, you can expect it to last 7-10 years if used properly.